Ashley Edgerton Oates
Metaphorical Self-portrait
Drawing II College LevelFigure Drawing Study
Drawing II College levelAdvanced Perspective Still Life (detail)
Drawing II College LevelPaper Bags
Drawing I College LevelFabric Drawing
Drawing II College LevelPaper Bags #2
Drawing I College LevelPaper Bags (detail)
Drawing I College LevelBraid
Beginning Photography 
Upper School StudentWindow
Beginning Photography 
Upper School StudentNashville Graffiti 
Photo I: College Level StudentMotion Project
Photo I: College Level StudentMarble
Beginning Photography 
Upper School StudentChain
Beginning Photography 
Upper School StudentShoe
Beginning Photography 
Upper School StudentPortrait of a Boy
Photo I: College Level StudentMusic Row
Photo I: College Level StudentSocial Commentary: Tuscaloosa, AL
Photo I: College Level StudentBuddha
Photo II: College level studentSocial Commentary Project 
Photo I: College level StudentInk Drawing from Sketchbook
2-D Design College levelAltered Book Project "Alice in Wonderland"
College Level 2-D design classAltered Book Project "The Hours"
College Level 2-D design classMiniature Book
Class 3Miniature Book #2"The Little Prince" Installation View
by Class Three 
photographed by Julie Guptill"The Little Prince" by Class Three 
photographed by Julie Guptill"The Little Prince" Installation View #2
by Class Three
photographed by Julie GuptillOne Point Perspective Collage into Drawing
Upper School FreshmanOne Point Perspective Collage into Drawing
Upper School FreshmanOne-point perspective collage into drawing
Upper School FreshmanStill Life with Rabbit
Class SixTunnel Book after Van Gogh
Class SixTunnel book after Van Gogh (detail)
Class SixTunnel Book for Alice in Wonderland
Class SixTunnel Book for Alice (Detail)
Class SixCoral Reef with printmaking
by Class ThreeSelf portrait in the style of Frida Kahlo #2
by Class ThreeSelf portrait in the style of Frida Kahlo #1
by Class ThreeStill Life with Dinosaur #3
by Class TwoStill Life with Dinosaur #2
by Class TwoStill Life with Dinosaur #1
by Class TwoPortrait in the style of Modigliani #4
by Class TwoPortrait in the style of Modigliani #3
by Class TwoPortrait in the style of Modigliani #2
by Class TwoPortrait in the style of Modigliani #1
by Class TwoSelf Portrait by Spencer Class OneInstallation view of Oaxacan Animals
by Class OneOaxacan Sculpture #3
by Class OneOaxacan Sculpture #1
by Class OneTree #2
by Class OneTree #1
by Class One
+ Previous Student Artwork 2002 - 2015
Teaching Philosophy

Students tell their own stories when making art. My job is to encourage each individual voice, so that my students can feel free and passionate making art and learning new media. In my experience presenting various design problems to students from grade one to college, I have observed that critical thinking skills thrive in the art studio even at the earliest levels. I provide a safe studio environment where my students can take creative risks and freely solve artistic problems. In our shared art space, students learn and refine technical and formal skills in an effort to better present their stories.

Elementary and middle school students review and implement the principles and elements of design in such a way that these compositional tools become a natural part of the creative process. Their individuality is beautifully apparent through their mark making and varied compositional styles. I expose students to art history and contemporary art, so that they may begin to see their own work as part of a larger cultural continuum.

For upper school students – particularly my photography students – technique, design elements, and craftsmanship are at the core of their work. However, the introduction of photographic history and theory, as well as political context, provides a more critical basis in which to create art. This also holds true for my college students who are held to higher standards in terms of craftsmanship, technique, and content, and are therefore expected to create a substantial body of work.

For all my students, I am their art coach, and my primary objective is to validate and encourage their voices. The artist’s individual voice is at the core of all creative endeavors. I am vigorously open to the suggestions, questions, and creations of students – as the give and take that exists in the art studio is exactly the type of engagement that keeps my classroom a vibrant space full of collaboration, growth, and possibility.
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